2020-07-30
Hi! We're taking another break and will be pausing our weekly emails. If you're able to do so: please join the ongoing protests and support bail funds and orgs fighting for justice 💗
Black Techno Futures: Local and Global Perspectives // The first discussion in the open-access Unsound 2020 series is titled Black Techno Futures: Local and Global Perspectives.

The discussion explores the conditions of working as a black person in the industry, diving into challenges and how things need to change for black people to survive and flourish. Panelists include Jasmine Infiniti (Brooklyn), Lakuti (Berlin/London), Axmed Maxamed (Amsterdam), Authentically Plastic (Kampala) and Onirica (Rio de Janeiro)

"When you call the embassy automatically they think of it as a White person, so they answer that way."

"I'm not focused on making myself acceptable to those that are othering me. Standing in all my intersections has been my path for the past few years, and it is so freeing."

"I'm sick of White people playing our music and making lots of money off of it when we play the music better at our parties, and they don't care about it."


Reactions To Rosh's Open Letter // People have known about and suffered from these problems of whitewashing, revision by omission, and "passive" but extremely active blacklisting [practices] for years and years now. And it's 2020, and there's a lot going on. Awareness is great to a point, but we need changes and solutions rather than conversations, think-pieces and all the rest. At the same time anything fuelling the whole destroy and rebuild, bin the establishment wave is appreciated.

Seeing the table listing over 40 club nights (either headed by Black promoters or with a large proportion of Black ravers) that were held in clubs which have been shut down for licensing or redevelopment is infuriating. In the resurgence of some of these clubs, many of these events have not been re-housed - gentrification of the nightlife speaks volumes here.

"Austerity, gentrification and policing go hand in hand.” For black people, the criminalisation and subjugation we face in the outside world is extended to our experiences of the club scene. Unfortunately, the UK press works in tandem with these forces: as the state takes our property and culture away from the black community, the UK music press actively erases our impact and role in shaping UK club culture.


Stereomodernism by DeForrest Brown, Jr. // “Stereomodernism” addresses the life, struggle, triumphs, and deaths of African Americans from 1619 to the present. The mix reinstates the original framing of techno as embodied aural history—and does so from a Black theoretical perspective, as a direct foil to Rainald Goetz’s 1998 novel Rave.

With “Stereomodernism,” I hope to counter the fantasy that is the white, Eurocentric view of a distinctly African American art form. Techno’s brutal roots were forged from generations and generations of Black trauma. The music culled from centuries of attempts to evade and subvert the status quo in America, which was established through the technocratic, racialized distribution of labor and capital.
No dancing, just listening: Berlin club Berghain reopens doors // Just 50 people are let in at a time to allow for physical distancing, but without the venue's notoriously picky doormen standing guard, no one has to worry about being denied entry. Visitors to the former power plant are enveloped by an eery, almost surreal soundscape of rhythmic throbbing, soft city noises, murmurings and even the whirling of helicopter blades.

INSIDE TRAX RECORDS: WHY CHICAGO'S HOUSE ORIGINATORS ARE FIGHTING FOR REPARATIONS // Countless similar stories of dodgy label dealings ring through the past and present of the music industry, and structural racism built into society means it is almost always white people who take up positions of power which enable them to exploit artists, who are frequently Black.
 
Six More NYC Restaurants & Bars Have Liquor Licenses Suspended For Pandemic Violations // In a press release, the governor's office adds that there have been nearly 1,100 compliance checks between July 21st and July 23rd, documenting violations at 84 establishments. Businesses found in violation of social distancing regulations face fines up to $10,000 per violation, while egregious violations can result in the immediate suspension of their liquor license.

Videos Show Social Distancing Scofflaws Partying At Chainsmokers' "Drive-In" Concert In The Hamptons // According to Bloomberg, the Winklevoss twins were among the celebs spotted at the event. They said that the parking spots cost as much as $25,000, and the top tier included an conditioned RV and private bathroom.

Whatever was meant to happen, the social distancing appeared to collapse at some point in the night.

Governor Cuomo has weighed in on the event, saying it was "a gross violation of not only the public health rules, it was a gross violation of common sense."


Goldman CEO Opens for Chainsmokers at Hamptons Concert


"We All Want To Pretend This Isn't Happening": Mask-Free Pandemic Parties Are Popping Up In NYC // "I love nightlife, but New York is my home. Every time you leave one of these events, you could be carrying the virus into your community. Who cares about techno?"

Have we, with a little help from the Chainsmokers, a Goldman Sachs CEO and a plot to hawk hand sanitiser in an aerosol can, reached peak 2020? // This new breed of millionaire businessman DJs might just be the worst thing to happen to dance music since the Chainsmokers.

A pair of electronic EDM music haircuts who profit from their beige bastardisation of black culture put on a massive show where social distancing seems to have been abandoned, during a global pandemic that is disproportionately killing black people, in order to hawk a brand of overpriced and un-necessarily over-engineered hand sanitiser in a gig where the warm-up DJ was CEO of investment bank Goldman Sachs. Phew. If this isn’t peak 2020 then I’m Wiley’s PR.
🤮🤮🤮🤮🤮🤮
Livestreams
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2020-07-23
In conversation: Anz & DJ Paulette // “I was written out of the history of raving in Manchester, and I’ve spent the last four years writing myself back in. When your name’s on every flyer and every poster, but in every single book [about it], you don’t exist? That’s bullshit" — DJ Paulette

"There’s a weird dynamic in play: when we say something racist has happened to us, we’re always told that it hasn’t; but when people treat us badly, we have to give them the benefit of the doubt or we’ll be seen as difficult. It’s a strange scenario because the forgiveness has to come from us and the change has to come from them.”

Anz: “Every generation has an impression of themselves, of how they are and act — ‘We’re not like old people, we’re different, we’re forward-thinking!’ — but it’s just history repeating itself. What makes me sad is seeing younger ravers and artists talking about ‘keeping politics out of music’. It seems as if there’s a minority of young people who are engaged with the issues and care about others, and a majority who don’t give a fuck.


“The latter may even be running parties and complain about ‘having to book someone because they’re a woman or Black’, and say coded things about [Black women] like ‘Oh, she’s actually a decent DJ you know!’ — well, why wouldn’t I be? I’m disappointed to see it in younger people because we have more access to information than any previous generation. Can you not just take a moment and... read something?”

Black Women Helped Build House Music. Their Credit Is Often Left off Records. // While many of the men who pioneered the genre like Frankie Knuckles, Ron Hardy, and Larry Levan have had their tales anthologized, the stories of Black women who helped usher in the new music as DJs, producers, and vocalists have often been sidelined, their credit left off of records and out of histories.

The challenges of racism and sexism within dance music still exist, as seen from the vicious harassment Black women working in the genre today have drawn for asserting themselves and challenging the status quo of dance music co-opted by White musicians with corporate backers and the old patriarchal boys’ club. But the foremothers from the era when house music was still emerging opened the doors for Black women in dance music to become more numerous.


A Brief History of Techno-Fascism, 1976-1996 // The final frontier now has a Starbucks on every corner with a cop at the entrance.

This current moment has changed all of our lives in a way where looking back to early March reflects a life now in the past-tense. I’m incredibly proud of the collective liberation that has been ongoing and pray that its becomes a norm towards the future.

These platforms we’re on are not our friends (see: enemies) and at some point this reaction must bend towards organizing a parallel power structure that we can all benefit from.

Parallel power structures and tending the grassroots are one and the same.

DJ FLIGHT ON EQ50 MENTORSHIP: “WE HOPE IT INSPIRES A NEW GENERATION OF WOMXN IN DRUM ‘N’ BASS” // The mentorship will work to redress d'n'b's gender imbalance and pair each mentee with one of Critical Music, Function Records, Ram Records, Shogun Audio and V Recordings.

“For the drum ‘n’ bass scene to reach gender parity during club nights and festivals, we need more mentorships every year for at least the next three years. We need more record labels, industry executives and promoters to commit so we see real, lasting transformative change”


"Equally as important is that we hope more men in positions of power commit to even-ing out the gender imbalance by being vocally and actively supportive of womxn, in all aspects of the industry, and not only when it directly benefits themselves."

"I would like to see DJs and labels actually add clauses to their contracts to make sure womxn are included in line-ups. If the booking agents also make sure they sign more female artists, then there’s more for the promoters to choose from, instead of the same womxn all the time.

Like A Battle: The Push For UK Garage's Future // Following a string of violence at shows across 2001, a pretext was created to ramp up subjugation of Black British music, something that continues to this day in various shapes: Form 696, which sought to prevent non-white crowds from gathering for anything larger than a birthday party; the Met Police's Trident operation, which stopped any artist with vague gang connections from performing at all; and years of New Labour politicians, from David Blunkett to Ken Livingstone, pinning urban violence on those chronicling it, rather than tackling the root causes.

"Anyone who complains is usually from the same demographic," he sighs. "They're 40-plus, white, and they believe they have the right to dictate to me what to do because they were there at a particular time and have certain records. They're taking up space. I'm going to keep speaking up about this."

Operators within the new wave of UK garage, male and female, have been subjected to harassment and intimidation from elders. One DJ said that threatening voice notes and phone calls from a garage-turned-dubstep pioneer "are a rite of passage if you're coming up" but asked to have their name withheld, lest they have to "sleep with one eye open." Several people confided in me that they were mindful about the fallout of this piece being published. This is no way to foster a community.


Visiting Practitioner: Frankie Decaiza Hutchinson (Discwoman) 28/05/2020

Marea Stamper changes name from The Black Madonna // Stamper made the change a day after Detroit artist Monty Luke launched an online petition titled "The Black Madonna: It's Time To Change The Name," which was supported by King Britt, among others. Luke called the name "problematic, offensive" and "cultural appropriation."

Researchers Need 4,000 Volunteers to Study How Coronavirus Spreads at Concerts // As of this writing, more than 940 volunteers have signed up to participate. The researchers say they should be ready to present the results of the experiment in early October.

State Suspends Liquor Licenses Of Four NY Establishments For Pandemic Violations // The four bars in question are: Brik Bar and M.I.A. (Made In Astoria), both in Astoria; Maspeth Pizza in Maspeth, Queens; and Secrets Gentlemen's Club in Deer Park.

"They Ambushed Us": NYPD Clears City Hall Occupation In Pre-Dawn Raid // Yessenia Benitez, a 29-year-old social worker, said she was "traumatized" by the NYPD's pre-dawn raid.

"There are families here," Benitez said. "There are individuals here who this is their only safe space. We provide them with free mental health resources, free hot meals, free clothing...the police came in, they didn’t give a warning and they started throwing people’s items."

Mayor de Blasio defended the decision to clear the camp at 4 a.m., claiming the occupation "had become less and less about protest, more and more about homeless individuals who have gathered there." He said he authorized the raid on Tuesday and praised the NYPD's handling of the operation.
Watch this one with the sound on... 😂😂😂
Protests
Livestreams
Nowadays Community Programmer Zoë Beery chats to Bandcamp's Editorial Director, J. Edward Keys and Chief Curator, Andrew Jarvis.
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2020-07-16
A LETTER TO RA and the rest of the UK music press // Writing for DJ Mag, Matt Anniss concludes that if your beloved Black and working class scene isn’t receiving the sort of coverage you feel it deserves, because say… DJ Mag themselves, RA or Mixmag is full of white middle class people that somehow missed it, then simply open a blank Word doc and write a tome on it.

The consequences of having one of RA’s most prominent writers conclude that UK Funky was largely irrelevant is that, a part of UK dance music history and specifically a part of Black UK dance music history becomes erased by one of the largest underground music publications in the world.

The value of UK funky lays in how it’s been successfully co-opted by white DJs. None of the scene’s active players or originators are mentioned.

The London club scene is a reflection of white supremacy, with clubs playing genres created by queer Black and Latinx communities, yet remaining gatekeeped by white DJs and crowd goers. “This was an industry created by us, but ruled ENTIRELY by white people,”… …“When I play my music, Black people say it’s white ‘oonz oonz’ music…” …Yet at the same time, when going on nights out, she notices that “there’s no Black people in the club, there isn’t a single Black DJ. So, of course, you can’t see a place for yourself there.” (‘Dance music was created by us, but is ruled entirely by white people’: meet rising DJ OK Williams)

The most glaring example of white co-opting usually happens in the form of glowing reviews of specialised mixes by more in-trend DJs of genres still actively participated in by the Black and working class communities that started them.

Rewarding these nostalgic throwbacks to UK Black music by favoured white DJs erases the work of those artists that were there when it happened and are still there now. It suggests that the value of the music is intrinsically tied to what successful white DJs think of it.

Media outlets rewarding obvious novelty reveals the limit of their exposure, their unanimously narrow shared experience on show for all to see. Black music will always be history, an incredible event that occurred as told by the white people that survived to tell it.

The more videos profiling London shufflers you watch, such as the iGOTSHAPES series, the more you realise that the demonisation of shuffling is a lazy dog whistle. The running thread being participants are sometimes Black but always working class. These are not the posh deep house ravers from west London, or the Italian tech-house deep V entourage. This was literally a working class movement at the heart of the capital.

Years of writing for a white audience, about white artists with white voices will not be undone quickly. Techno, as RA and most of its readers define it, might never have a Black or at least a more geographically representative mixed audience again.

For every Pitchfork, Quietus or private blogpost article on UK Black music that feels like a win, it should be contextualised next to the sheer length, depth and ubiquity their white counterparts received in the same time period.

Resident Advisor don’t owe anyone any coverage. They have a right to curate their platform however they see fit. If they want to spend years neglecting to tell the stories of women in dance music, they can. If their very narrow definitions of what house and techno is happens to disproportionally affect Black people still very much active and participating in dance music, they can. But RA have a fundamental duty to properly represent the scenes that they spend so much time observing the roots of over and over again.

1,000 retrospective explorations on Jeff Mills or Kerri Chandler would not make up for the damage done here. Constantly reminding your audience of house & techno’s roots is meaningless if you refuse to recognise the perpetual invention of new sounds and scenes that Black artists are contributing to, as they happen.

I would like to also suggest possible ways to take things forward:
1. The End of Communication Agencies
2. Restructuring of Editorial: Nepotism Reduction, Coverage of Individuals, Go Black and Go Wide, Open Submission, Independent Complaints Commission


Red Bull fires top North American executives following internal controversy over Black Lives Matter and the leak of an offensive presentation slide // Insiders said it was widely believed the North American execs were fired because corporate leaders in Austria blamed them for the leaks and internal tensions behind them.

The culture teams were seen as the most vocal about racial justice matters and US staffers saw the restructuring as a form of punishment.

Change Comes Through Consistent Conscious Action // “Something that must be avoided is the hiring of BAME staff that share exactly the same viewpoints and touchstones on the scene as their white counterparts, or replacements, and calling it job done. It's important that new hires come from communities with a very different perspective and outlook. If they can't name one track from Call Super’s catalogue that's a good thing.”

Music’s Biggest Companies Are Asking Legislators to Save Indie Venues // The world’s three biggest music companies — Universal Music Group, Sony Music Entertainment, and Warner Music Group — signed the letter along with streaming services such as Spotify, Amazon Music, and YouTube, and trade groups that include the Recording Industry Association of America.

The letter also reiterates figures NIVA has previously brought to legislators, including that 90 percent of its member venues worry they will permanently close if the pandemic lasts six months and no further aid is given.

Online Radio Voices In The Middle East And North Africa // "Online radio is the real opportunity for independent artists to be represented and heard; the message and voices of people must be put in the right context. The youth in Palestine are now ready to broadcast to all corners of the world with no restrictions or hierarchy, just pure passion and pride."

As it stands, internet problems are still abundant in the Middle East, and broadcast equipment is expensive and often unattainable. With general restrictions leading to at least one in five events being cancelled regularly, the sheer amount of red tape has left Middle Eastern countries oscillating between a healthy, somewhat-sustainable scene for alternative music, and one of regular clampdowns and extended periods of stasis. But COVID-19 has done its bit to change all of that, at least for online radio.


Where are the Women in Drum & Bass? // My research into the history of jungle and the role of women in jungle and drum & bass has revealed three insights. Firstly, in the ‘90s, the jungle scene was balanced in terms of race and gender, but by the end of the decade, it had lost most women and black people. Secondly, some men tried to errantly justify the loss of women to aesthetics of sound and space. Finally, professional women in drum & bass and jungle are severely marginalised by men at all levels.

Off their heads: the shocking return of the rave // Young people were obeying the lockdown rules – until suddenly they were not. “The raves started to boom about a month after lockdown, once most people realised they weren’t going to get sick.”

“A month ago, people would have said: ‘No you can’t go partying, that’s awful!’ But the way it’s been handled by the government, now we have a different perspective. They’ve given us such mixed messages all the way through … Boris Johnson wanted herd immunity, didn’t he? He’s achieved that, by being so wishy-washy about the whole thing.”

For young people who have experienced only a commercialised club scene, illegal raves feel like discovering dance music in Technicolor.


After A Quick (And Questionable) COVID Test, Rooftop Pandemic Pool Parties Rage In LIC // "Like anyone else in nightlife community, I want to see people get their jobs back, I want to see nightlife come back, but there's a right way to do it and a wrong way to do it."

"I'm seeing lots of people taking time to workshop precautions. So when I see something like Profundo, that is misleading people just so they can circumvent the social distancing rules to throw a Vegas-style pool party, it's ruining it for everyone else who is trying to give it their best shot to go about this the right way. If we get put on second shutdown, that's going to affect all the other bars and nightlife places trying to make honest efforts to be social and safe."


Dweller Library
Protests
Livestreams
Thursday
Friday
8-12 // Virtual Friday: La Rabia Takeover // La Rabia is a local New York party focused on bringing you a full spectrum of bass music with power hour sets from cry$cross, DJ LITA, marvelito, and gooddroid.
Saturday
8-12 // Virtual Saturday: Ali Coleman All Night // A New Jersey native, Ali has been serving up soulful house and disco to some of New York’s best dance floors for nearly 20 years, and we’re thrilled to have him share the love with us virtually on the stream, directly from our booth.
Sunday
4-8 // Quaran-Tea Dance presents T4T with Octo Octa // For our fifteenth edition, the SF Bay Area Queer Nightlife Fund joins forces once again with T4T, a party for trans folks and allies.

5-9 // Virtually Nowadays: Mister Sunday with Justin Carter and Powder // Tokyo's Powder consistently provides some of the most enchanting DJ sets our ears have ever heard, and every time she's played at Nowadays it's like a homecoming. We'll have to celebrate virtually for now, until we can be together again.
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2020-07-09
European Design Has Colonized House and Techno // Understanding that Berlin is “the” standing global cultural hub for techno music, we have become subconsciously colonized by a method of music production that aims to work optimally within the specific confines of this city’s most popular spaces. Other global techno communities have gone on to uncritically mimic this particular construction and ignore their own unique listening spaces.

We have considered the specific parameters of these places in Berlin to be the ideal listening environments, the standard for this music, for so long that when they were shuttered indefinitely, we were left with a large experiential void that the advent of online live-streaming could not fill satisfactorily. I consider this a reckoning of techno’s original Black roots, where the music need not be married to any one space, but instead be an expression of lived experience.

The effects of this institutional understanding of techno music will not go away despite the new racial and interpersonal paradigm shift. Black artists continue to be sidelined by major events—ones who will post black squares on their Instagram feeds in an act of performative solidarity but will not use their platform to uplift actual Black people.

What the industry does instead is champion white DJs and producers for adhering to this formula, as seen in the latest Awakenings digital festival lineup. For those who argue that this gatekeeping is necessary to preserve a sense of quality, I would counter argue that this major collective conditioning has led us to expect the exact same formula of artistry replicated—even when there’s no real “warehouse” to physically be in. The unwritten rules we demand this music adhere to were based on severely limited, racially-informed parameters that effectively don’t exist right now. The idealized listening space, as such, never existed to begin with.


A new generation of black artists are reclaiming the roots of techno music // Parrish seemed to unveil the meaning of dance music culture itself: “Escapism has always been an adjective used to describe the dance. That’s an outsider’s view. Solidarity is what it really offers.”

Four years later — with our nightclubs emptied and our streets filled with protesters rejecting the lethal racism of American police — it’s a good time for citizens of the nightlife to think about that offer of solidarity. The dance floor can be a place where solidarity begins. It shouldn’t be where it ends.

The Music Industry Is Wrestling With Race. Here’s What It Has Promised. // The nationwide soul-searching in the wake of George Floyd’s death has been felt with particular acuteness in the music industry, which owes much of its wealth to the work of Black artists but has just a handful of Black executives in the most senior jobs. Scrutiny has brought the business together in rare ways, with corporate rivals taking part in passionate discussions over Zoom and major companies promising to diversify their ranks.

Still, a thread of anger and impatience remains palpable behind the scenes.

White out! Tony Herrington calls time on the monoculture that is the experimental sound and music industry // One of the true bastions of white hegemony in the arts is the industry that has developed around the matrix of experimental music, sound art, electronic composition, field recordings, drones, ambient, noise, etc

The white people involved in these areas of cultural activity, whether they be label runners, festival programmers, academics, curators, critics, etc, consider themselves to be progressive, inclusive, woke even. They think they are at the cutting edge of contemporary sound and music. They wrap themselves and their fantasies in rhetoric which claims they are engaged in politicised artistic activity, and having profound philosophical thoughts about the place of sound and music in society. They would not regard themselves as smug, self-satisfied, complacent, deluded, exclusionary, racist.

They wouldn’t be worth bothering with if the industry they control wasn’t so powerful and influential in terms of deciding what kind of artists get to release or present music, or be talked about, under these banners of experimental, art, composition, etc. They would be irrelevant if this industry hadn’t asserted itself to the point where it has come to dominate the so called intellectual high ground when it comes to discoursing on matters of sound and music, and used that status to shore up swathes of money and prestige, from funding for festivals, residencies and commissions to academic tenure, publishing deals and media coverage.

To anyone who is half awake and has been watching this industry develop over the last two decades none of this will come as a surprise. But in the current climate, after all the supposed soul searching that has gone on in arts and cultural sectors around the world regarding this exact thing, to see it continue unabated is bewildering.


NYC’s second Black-owned LGBTQ+ bar to open in Harlem // Lambda Lounge officially opens on July 11th—just blocks from the city's only other Black-owned gay bar. Until government officials allow bars to welcome guests indoors, they plan to open a deck and backyard space on Saturdays between 6-11pm. 

A crowd-sourced list of Black artists on Bandcamp.

What is the future of partying in a post-pandemic world?

Far from COVID hysteria about virtual concerts, the future of live music hinges on deeper relationships between people and venues. Membership based social clubs would be a start. Like gyms, they eliminate risk of walk up and allow for easy and consistent support.

Dweller Library
Protests
Thursday
Friday
7-10 // Elsewhere Sunstreams: Jubilee, Star Eyes // Two bass queens unite on Sunstreams. Star Eyes is synonymous with raw underground bass music. A founding member of the world-renowned Trouble & Bass crew, currently at the helm of the Chaos Clan. Jubilee brings her Miami beach-rave roots to NYC’s dancefloors. The Mixpak signee is known for her thrilling pan-genre sets and mix compilation/party series known as Magic City.

☼ benefits The Okra Project. Elsewhere will be donating $500, plus matching donations up to $1500 from the audience, with each event.


7-12 // FIXED Livestream with Juan Maclean // The Juan MacLean returns to our FIXED livestream from the Bad Room to support Good Room!

8-12 // Virtually Nowadays: Beautiful Swimmers, DJ Freez and Sleepy G // It's DC in the house with some of the finest party-starting selectors the city (and continent) has to offer.
Saturday
1-9 // Electric Unity Live Stream Supporting Black Lives Matter // Come join us in Electric Unity with our free Live Stream Twitch DJ sets from 1-9pm! Following the day of music, we invite you to watch an exclusive, ticketed, virtual screening of ELECTRIC ROOTS: The Detroit Sound Project. Sponsored by Washington Hill Pictures, Michigan Electronic Music Collective, and The TAROTE' Foundation. A portion of the proceeds from ticket sales, as well as GSGEDM.com merchandise purchases during the event, will be donated to Black Lives Matter.
8-12 // Virtually Nowadays: Groovy Groovy with Akanbi and DJ Temporary // Roving New York party Groovy Groovy always delivers cutting-edge style from DJs on the forefront of a new sound, and their residents deliver no less. Akanbi and DJ Temporary take over the stream.
Sunday
5-9 // Virtually Nowadays: Mister Sunday with Justin Carter and Eamon Harkin
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2020-07-02
A Conversation on the Bleaching of Techno: How Appropriation is Normalized and Preserved // Mathys: Adopting Black identities to gain some legitimacy is far from a recent phenomenon.

Axmed: I honestly think that you are giving some of the artists too much credit in thinking that they put a lot of thought in their use of Black identities. I’d argue that it is more about white artists seeing the world as their playing field and not caring about the consequences and the impact of their choices on Black and brown artists and partygoers. When it comes down to it, it is about the scene not caring about Black people, which is of course a product of the society we live in.

In addition to that, there are still ways that adopting Black identity is a selling point. 'T
he diggers scene' is where mostly white djs and label owners want to be the first one to ‘discover’ music from ‘far lands’, taking away people’s cultures without understanding the meaning behind the music, and marketing it to mostly white audiences.


Mathys: It’s in a way a reflection of neocolonialism. When people think about music from the African continent which is actually interesting in the context of dance music, they do not think about all the new up-and-coming South African musicians, all the innovations in the Nigerian scene, etc… They have a certain idea of what “African music” is supposed to sound like, and this goes through the white gaze: it has to sound authentic, low-tech, and if there’s any tech involved, it has to be salvaged.

This isn’t just about the music but also about the story, and this is what a neocolonial approach looks and sounds like. A label locally run would be much more ethical, without as much focus on this neocolonial narrative of “discovering” gems, whose value was underestimated before they were “re-discovered” by a white man.

“Selectors” rarely engage with the culture. Some DJs actually take the time to learn about the context of the music they play and really reflect about their praxis, especially when they accept to be held accountable for their mistakes. But it is certainly not the norm.

Mathys: One of the issues is that the desire to change has to come from a place of actually caring without being forced to.

Dweller Library


Dance Music Pioneer Kevin Saunderson: The Scene Is Still Failing Black Artists // "When we started creating the sound, it was only Black people who were listening to the music that was being made by myself, Juan, Derrick, Eddie Fowlkes, Blake Baxter and the handful of people in Detroit who were making this music and were all Black artists. We had a handful people who came out to dance -- like, 600 or 700 -- who’d come to just about every party. It was all Black. Simple as that.

What do you aspire for the scene to look like?

It should be women, Black, white, wherever you’re from, as long as you have a talent and a sound that you want to promote ... because otherwise, you get these gimmicky artists that make s---ty music that becomes popular and makes millions of dollars, when they’re not really talented and it’s just all about marketing. A lot of people lose out. More talented people don’t get known. But if they’re making money, they’re just going to repeat it. So you get s---ty music and people get EDM all mixed up with techno, and there’s all sorts of confusion.

Do you feel like the people who produce the biggest dance music events, let's say Ultra or EDC or Coachella, have a responsibility to book more Black artists?

I think so. The problem is that many of the people in power in these companies don’t really care, and they don’t know. Some of them also came in way after the fact and they don’t care about the history or integrity of music -- they care about the money. So yeah, they’ve got a responsibility to correctly represent the culture they’re profiting from, but the responsibility in their mind is only to make money.

I hate to say this, but you almost feel like somebody is basically eliminating Black artists and producers from participating and being part of the scene. So once I go off and die, and other people who’ve been around from the beginning are gone, who’s left? We’ve been doing this 35 years. If there’s talent, they should have the same opportunity or better opportunities.

Theo Parrish - We Are All Georgeous Monsterss // Art has always taken a back seat in American society. Since the 20th century began, Black artists have traveled to Europe to enjoy a level of economic and social freedom that is much harder to maintain at home. Relying on European society to pay the bills is a pitfall in itself. From observing patrons in Blackface at Paradiso in Amsterdam, calling out Dimensions Festival for non-payment of $20,000, to the infamous Berghain incident which remains the only time he has ever been kicked off the decks, the imbalance of having to endure microaggressions on all fronts in order to do your job is lost on many of the patrons of these festivals and megaclubs.

The liberation and development of Black people will not be solved by tokens and handouts in an industry that does not listen or include us. Economic stability can never be achieved on a level playing field, equality cannot come about if all the participants are not conscious of their actions. We stand at a crossroads with an uncertain path not only for dance music culture but society as a whole. There is no more place for centrists, the writing is on all the walls, makeshift masks have fallen off for the world to see.

The Sound of a Movement: 18 Creatives on the Black Queer Future of Dance Music // The large umbrella of what many refer to as “electronic dance music” — which encompasses subgenres from ballroom and Jersey club to trance and dubstep — derived from two sibling genres: Chicago house and Detroit techno. These two styles were pioneered by Black DJs in the ‘80s and ‘90s, who played for rooms of Black and Brown queer people seeking refuge and release on the dance floor.

From its outset, house and techno culture surrounded radical ideals of liberation, utopia, Afrofuturism, protest, and collectivism — all in the face of white supremacist models of exploitation and oppression. These are the same models that now seek to erase dance music’s Black queer origins, marginalize Black queer DJs, and push Black queer people out of nightlife spaces in order to commodify their culture for the masses.

Russell E.L. Butler (DJ): The white man does shit to us. Black people suffer. They extract our pain like it's gold, and then they sell it back to everybody else. What do you do with that knowledge when you get it? You get used to the betrayal.

Part of what really influences my perspective on dance music is that the idea of genre is a form of colonialism and an attempt to minimize, for the sake of consumption, the real and vital cultural developments that come from oppressed people as a means of survival.

Madison Moore (DJ, professor, and writer): The question that always drives my work is how art and beauty are created under duress, or in state of emergency. Through performance and world making in [dance music and queer nightlife], you really get a sense of the state of emergency that marginalized people live in — before this pandemic and the simultaneous pandemic of anti-Blackness that we've had for 400 years.

Turtle Bugg (DJ and writer): A lot of the movement of finding rare records and the history of this music is told largely from a European perspective, because they have the means and interest to do so. But I like to say, “How can you know where you're going if you don't know where you've been?” If no one's getting the stories from the source, you're not going to get the truth. It’s imperative that Black people hear the stories from Black people from another Black person.

Mandy Harris Williams (Founder of Rave Reparations): [Our mission is], one, Black queer people should get in for free. Two, support Black party throwers. And three, support Black contemporary music makers and DJs.

Kenni Javon (Founder of Dick Appointment): We book nothing but Black and Brown people, because that's the party. Then, the flyer and visuals. We want people to know that this is the energy and this what you're going to get. Pretty much everyone who hosts are our friends. It’s really just keeping it Black and keeping it to our roots.

Dee Diggs: Uprisings kind of make us see that we don't have to just settle for that bare minimum. We can push for some more deeper systemic changes, putting more Black people into leadership positions. You just need to have someone on your team and not only give people that opportunity, but also make them feel comfortable and empowered enough to speak up.

Russell E.L. Butler: I've seen a couple waves of this. I've seen this shit happen where people are like, "Oh, I want to do better.” Then ain't shit happen. The reason why each time we see the uprising get more intense and go for longer and longer is because motherfuckers aren't listening willfully at this point.

They have generations of spiritual pain that they have to atone for. That's not just going to go away by some fucking retreats, a couple of hashtags, and throwing a couple different people some Venmos. Material, real structural change needs to occur. Some of these big white DJs need to take a step back.

SHYBOI: If we can have [COVID-19] managed... I can’t even imagine what's going to happen when we can safely be at clubs and dance. We're going to be like, "Here we are literally fighting for a new world. We get to fight together on the streets at the protests, and here we are at the club doing it.” Because it all relates to each other. It always does.

Larry Heard and Robert Owens file lawsuit against Trax Records for unpaid royalties and exploitation // "I discovered that Larry had found himself in a situation with Trax Records where his lack of legal representation on his first recordings allowed his artistry to be ruthlessly exploited. This story is true of Robert and lots of other artists signed to Trax."

Earlier this month, a Just Giving page aiming to raise money for Chicago acid house pioneer Adonis and his never-seen Trax royalties went viral.

SD11 - w/ DeForrest Brown, Jr. - This is How our Holocaust Happens // We talked about the East Village in the age of COVID, DeForrest's forthcoming book: "Assembling a Black Counter Culture" in light of the killing of George Floyd and the BLM demonstrations all over the world.

Defunding the Police: What Does It Mean? A Conversation with Alex Vitale // Zoë Beery, Nowadays community event programmer and safer space monitor, as well as a journalist, discusses the concept of defunding the police with the author of "The End of Policing", Alex Vitale.

At NYC’s Queer Liberation March, Protestors Returned Pride to Its Roots //
This year, Pride was observed not with corporate parades or exclusionary dance parties, but nationwide protests against police brutality. Officially titled “Queer Liberation March for Black Lives and Against Police Brutality,” an estimated 50,000 demonstrators showed out to protest the systemic racism characteristic of police departments across the country.

While the march itself transpired with little police presence, that changed when the group neared Washington Square Park, where demonstrators were met by dozens of officers with batons, handcuffs, and tear gas at the ready. Tensions boiled over when protesters tried to stop cops from arresting a handful of individuals for graffiti. According to videos from the scene, officers responded to those protesting police brutality with exactly that.

Watch “Vogue 4 #BlackLivesMatter,” a Dance Video Showing Vogue as Joyful Protest // From Chicago to San Francisco and New York City, voguers have taken to the streets, dipped in front of cop cars, and created impromptu balls in the midst of protest, as House of Xtravangaza member and ballroom academic Sydney Baloue points out for the New York Times. By practicing an artform that originated in Black and Latino LBGTQ+ communities in the ‘70s, these dancers remind us that Black queer and trans folks should be centered the fight against police brutality.

“Voguing has always been a protest,” Jack Mizrahi Gucci, ballroom icon and founder of the House of Gorgeous Gucci, told the Times. “The dance itself, in all of its campy glory, has always been about, ‘Look at me, I’m here. I matter, and look what I can do.’ So doing it on the streets, doing it on a cop car, is letting you know... ‘I’m here. I matter.’”


Stonewall Inn Gets $250K Donation To Avoid Pandemic Closure // The donation was announced on Sunday, which marked the 51st anniversary of the Stonewall Uprising.

The NY Times wrote about the struggles that gay bars in particular were facing because of coronavirus. That extended to the Stonewall, even though it's been designated a city landmark, a state historical site and a national monument. “If Stonewall, the most iconic LGBTQ bar in the world, is facing an uncertain future, then think about everybody else.”


Good vibrations: how Bandcamp became the heroes of streaming // Bandcamp has become a lifeline for artists doing something different, cooking up new ideas with little regard for trends, scenes or playlists. The streaming services aren’t designed for music like that. “They’re never going to pick out the thing that’s different. Freaks on the music scene do that, music writers do that, really skillful radio programmers do that. But the algorithm is never going to do that.”

To support musicians during Covid-19, we’re once again waiving our revenue share on all sales this Friday, July 3, from midnight to midnight Pacific Time.

Anti-Algorithmic Music: How Bandcamp Is Helping Artists Beat The Odds // Matt McDermott speaks with Bandcamp CEO Ethan Diamond, HAUS Of ALTR head MoMa Ready and journalist Miles Bowe on the online record store that's changing underground music.

An update from RA's editors // RA has, throughout its history, been a predominantly white organization that viewed this music through a white lens. That's a disservice to our audience and our community, and has clearly hurt our output, limiting the range of perspectives on the site and allowing for awful mistakes like the racist line in our 2019 review of Gottwood festival.

RA, like so many dance music institutions, will never be able to repay the debt it owes to Black culture and artists, but in all the moves we make going forward, that debt will always be in the front of our minds. These actions are only the beginning of what will be a permanent, ongoing process.


RA launches subscription service, Resident Subscriber // As an independent company, our coverage has been funded primarily by booking fees for tickets sold on the site, as well as on-site display advertising for events, clubs and festivals. The coronavirus pandemic has significantly impacted those revenue streams.

Protests
Livestreams
Thursday
Friday
7-10 // Elsewhere Sunstreams: Soul Summit // While we can't be together on the rooftop physically this month, we'll be bringing you sunset live-streams from our rooftop every week, in support of community resource and racial justice organizations.

8 // Virtually Nowadays: Priori & Taves
Saturday
12-5 // Streaming From Isolation: Boiler Zoom // Detroit techno royalty Robert Hood joins Shanti Celeste, OK Williams and Afrodeutsche for a Boiler Room isolation session to raise money for NAACP.

6-12 // The Bunker Stream with Turtle Bugg and Portage Garage Sounds // The Bunker will be giving half of our donations as direct aid to a black trans DnB pioneer in the U.S. scene who is in need of assistance.

8 // Virtually Nowadays: Analog Soul All Night
Sunday
5 // Virtually Nowadays: Mister Sunday w/ Theo Parrish All Day
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2020-06-24
Dweller Library // Our co-editor Ryan Clarke has researched a list of articles, interviews and documentaries about techno and its history. We have compiled it into this library that will be updated as we find more relevant work.

A Brief History of the Policing of Black Music // For as long as Black music has been popular, crossover, coveted by white listeners and dissected by white critics, it has also been criminalized by white police at all levels of law enforcement.

The fact that record companies and clubs and recording studios are owned primarily by white men adds another trapdoor to the labyrinth that polices Black music at every level.

Hip hop, which began in Black neighborhoods as entirely ours, was colonized and coopted and policed into a popular form whose translation to white venues often reduces the music to sound and fury.

What is the point of yelling about Black liberation to a bunch of white middle class college students, or at festivals where Black people aren’t even really comfortable or in attendance? What is the point of producing all this music to make white record executives richer and give them what they believe is a hood pass to obsess over and imitate Black forms?


Why Are the NYPD ‘Hip-Hop Police’ Spying on Rappers? // If cops believe an artist’s appearance is likely to create violence, the NYPD will threaten the club owner with a raid.

“You approach them and you tell the clubs, ‘If you allow this rapper there and, God forbid, he shoots somebody or something happens, we're going to take it out on you. We’re going to have a M.A.R.C.H.’”

Sometimes, M.A.R.C.H. raids can be called even if there’s no violence—they happen simply if the club books an artist the cops don’t want them to.


What is the future of partying in a post-pandemic world? // Even if DJs slash their fees as expected, the fantasy of running venues at 60 per cent capacity is exactly that – a fantasy.

Parties that exist primarily for queer or non-white audiences will be the first to take a hit, because it’s a cloistered scene by trade, and often by necessity too. Pricing people out of nightlife entrenches the structure that led to such a fucked-up imbalance in the first place.

As much as everyone would love hegemonies to get broken up, only institutions with deep pockets can afford to run events below capacity for now. And already, these institutions are shirking responsibility. Live Nation taking a $500m investment from Saudi Arabia’s sovereign wealth fund while simultaneously pushing the financial burden of cancelling shows onto artists should send everyone’s blood running cold.

In the wake of protests that broke out across the globe, countless promoters, platforms, and actors within the music industry have pledged to be more equitable and stop being so incessantly self-involved, but this already feels compromised. Set aside the argument about individuals being at fault for actions of the state for a minute. If you were lacing up your shoes to hit the streets for your 30th straight day of protests and scrolled past a video of the same white dudes who posted a black square on Instagram now dancing on chairs in a fancy courtyard, wouldn’t you call them on being full of shit?


The future of music: ‘No one has anything positive to say about physically distanced gigs. At all’ // The economic pain is being felt most keenly, perhaps, at the level of bricks and mortar. Shuttered venues up and down the land have held auctions, turned into record labels, crowdfunded and cried out for financial lifelines to see them through closure. A campaign, #saveourvenues, has launched in defence of grassroots music clubs for whom months of inactivity will be a death knell. You can bet they will get turned into flats if they’re not sustained.


Ben Assiter Interview // Where most journalistic writing has positioned audiophile bars as a ‘slow listening’ response to the over-saturation of music in contemporary culture, I reflected instead on the rise of audiophile bars during a period which has been a real struggle for many traditional night clubs.

Given the ways in which much of club culture is still framed in the limiting terms of anti-social behavior, I considered how a space focussed on static forms of listening rather than dance may fit more comfortably into gentrified visions of urban night time culture.

Most conversations have tended to position music venues as victims of gentrification. This is a very real and significant issue, with many more stories to be told. However, I would also like to see more research into the ways in which musical spaces may simultaneously be complicit in these processes of urban change.

There is a really great short piece from 2016 by Marie Thompson entitled ‘UK Music Venues and the Auditory Politics of Gentrification’. A more recent article by Alessio Kolioulis from 2018 explores how nightclubs can be a central part of urban regeneration. If anyone is interested in the Japanese origins of audiophile bars, this is a really interesting article by David Novak from 2008.


Interdependence 5 - Liz Pelly // In this episode we speak with the writer Liz Pelly, who over the past 5 years has written a series of revelatory critical pieces about the streaming economy for The Baffler.

Pitchfork Staffers Stage Work Stoppage in Protest of Condé Nast’s ‘Union-Busting’ //
Top executives have fielded questions about diversity, pay inequality, some higher-ups’ inappropriate old tweets, and accusations of racism at the publisher, among other topics.

Watch a new documentary about disco legend Sylvester // Billy Porter says: “He was a gender-fluid Black man in mainstream music. That hasn’t happened since. There’s been a lot of us who have tried, and I’ve been trying for 30 years. Nobody did it like Sylvester.”

From now on, Whities will be called AD 93 // I don't want the name to potentially exclude or offend anyone, or be a topic of conversation at all, and at times I feel this may have been the case. There is definitely an imbalance of diversity on the label, and that is something I'm addressing.
Wednesday
1-6 // United We Stream Global | Live from Basement, New York // 1pm Rachel Noon 2pm Mike Servito 3pm Volvox 4pm Anthony Parasole 5pm Xiorro. We have launched a GoFundMe. All donations will go to Black Lives Matter, Callen-Lorde, Glitz Inc, BASEMENT employees, the artists and NYC Nightlife United.
Thursday
5 // Carl Craig Sessions Launch Event with Carl Craig, DeForrest Brown Jr., and Kelly Kivland // This launch event for the Carl Craig Sessions offers a live conversation between renowned techno DJ and producer Carl Craig, sound theorist DeForrest Brown, Jr., and Dia curator Kelly Kivland.

The conversations will investigate the history and significance of techno and introduces the first session of film screenings, presenting Ton'y Cokes's Black Celebration (1988), Otolith Group's Hydra Decapita (2010), and Techno City: What is Detroit Techno? (2000). The three films are available to view here from Thu 6/25 12pm EST to Sun 6/28 9pm EST. RSVP and receive a Zoom link here.


7 // Not Mass: Jarrett Tebbets & Eddie C
Friday
7-10 // DIsCakes x SKORT // Pauli Cakes b2b Marley, Princess Peggie // Honored to kick off our virtual pride celebration with the SKORT and DisCakes crew, whose parties celebrate the queer + intersectional roots of electronic music, as well as radical self-expression, love for self & others, and community care 🦋 Benefitting Emergency Release Fund

Fri 3pm to Mon 1am // The Sound of New York 2020 : Pride Fundraiser // Pride and dancing go hand in hand, and with clubs closed around the world, we wanted to take this moment to highlight the colorful New York LGBTQI+ dance music community with a 56+ hour dance-a-thon with fundraising efforts geared toward Black Trans/Queer orgs. Via The Lot Radio we'll soundtrack your weekend whether it be a park hang, a BBQ, a small gathering with friends, or a protest.

Fri to Sun // Club Quarantäne // All money raised on our YouTube stream will be donated to the Centre for Black Equity in support of the Black Lives Matter movement. Underground & Black's takeover of our platform will be live until the next party starts here
Saturday
Sunday
3-9 // Virtually Sauna Pride // Baronhawk Poitier, Vicki Powell, Jesse Frank, Mr. White B2B MarceauxMarceaux + Special Guest

6-10 // As You Like It Coast to Coast: Pittsburgh, PA // Pittsburgh’s Boo Lean, ADAB, Ali Berger B2B Davis Galvin and San Francisco’s David Siska, Pittsburgh born and bred.
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2020-06-18

How Independent Music Venues Are Fighting for Their Existence // Even if local governments ease restrictions and allow spaces to open at, say, 25 percent capacity, most independent proprietors would still lose money. Medical experts agree that nightclubs are among the highest-risk situations for contracting COVID-19.

As the music industry at large confronts its own long-standing racial inequities, the relative lack of Black venue owners and promoters is another troubling reality.


Gwen Shockey’s Archive of NYC’s Lesbian Spaces Is More Important Than Ever // The ephemerality of these sacred spaces is why New York City-based artist Gwen Shockey has set out to preserve their memory through her Addresses Project (2016-present).

By conducting interviews and sifting through a slew of newspaper clippings, blogs, Facebook event listings, police records, tax information, and business bureau records, she has pinpointed nearly 100 lesbian bars and parties that have existed from 1900 to the present day throughout the city’s five boroughs.


Native Instruments is Facing Calls to Address an Inadequate Response to Alleged Racism Within the Company // “I was at NI for only a year, there were racist incidents regularly, also sexist incidents, and ableism issues as well. In the end I had to quit a job I loved and was passionate about to salvage my physical and mental health.”

“Without our statement on LinkedIn and the active help from the Artist community across social media, this story would have gone unnoticed again."

"We need to see an outline of how the company exactly is willing to take responsibility and learn from its past mistakes, and we need them to share a timeframe and actionable steps with their current and former employees, customers and users to read to ensure a safer environment for current and future BIPOC working at their company."


A History of Black British Rave Culture // A list of resources that you can watch, read, or listen to as a consumer of underground dance genres that highlight the origins of the scene, the oppression faced by those who founded it, and the discrimination that still remains in the industry today.
 
This Friday, Stand with Bandcamp to Support Racial Justice, Equality, and Change // This coming Juneteenth (June 19, from midnight to midnight PDT), and every Juneteenth hereafter, for any purchase you make on Bandcamp, we will be donating 100% of our share of sales to the NAACP. We're also allocating an additional $30,000 per year to partner with organizations that fight for racial justice and create opportunities for people of color.

Behind the Party Zine #001: COVID-19 Edition // This zine exists to share the voices of the workers behind nightlife and dance music. Any additional proceeds from those who pay above the baseline price will be donated to For The Gworls medical fund, a mutual aid fund that assists Black trans people in NY/NJ with travel to/from medical facilities and prescription co-pays.
Every Day
justiceforgeorgenyc // Information and updates on protests in NYC
Thursday
Friday
8 // DeForrest brings us BLACK NATIONALIST SONIC WEAPONRY // Moved by recent events and his own life experiences of action, DeForrest began working on a musical release that would serve as the conceptual backdrop for the real struggle playing out on the streets of all major American cities over the past month.

8-12 // Underground Resistance All Night // We're celebrating Juneteenth with eternal heroes and some of the most influential figures to come out of Detroit specifically, and techno in general: Underground Resistance.
Saturday & Sunday
Friday 6/26
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2020-06-11

// Here’s a few 30-second scripts that automatically send emails to support the cause:

  1. https://www.8toabolition.com/ This is for every state, not just NY.
  2. Defund12 has a script that sends an email to every NY City Council member asking them to deny the mayor’s proposed 2021 budget, which continues to overfund the NYPD ($6 billion..!) and takes funds away from education and social services
  3. @buddhas_hand_ has linked scripts that email the NYC Comptroller (who manages budgets) urging them to defund the police, NY Assembly Members to repeal 50-A, and more scripts for other states and cities.

Or go old school and call or email your representative & let them know you support the Justice in Policing Act & encourage further action. You can find contact info for your Congressional representative here & your Senator here.

For voting in the upcoming election, you have until June 16 to request an Absentee ballot.

Every Day
justiceforgeorgenyc // Centralized information and updates on protests in NYC
Friday
9-3 // HARDER // Keenan Orr (DC), Kelly Naughton (DAD SF), opening set: SPRKLBB (HARDER). A portion of the proceeds will be donated to Black Lives Matter.
Saturday
3-12 // The Carry Nation All-Stars Season 3 // The gurls of Sweet Carry High will be out in full force with music from The Carry Nation and Fatherhood. We'll be raising money for GLITS Inc., a charity founded by our good friend Ceyenne Doroshow, which helps provide housing for the Black trans community 💗
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2020-06-04
Thursday / Friday / Saturday / Sunday
justiceforgeorgenyc // Centralized information and updates on protests in NYC #GeorgeFloyd #BlackLivesMatter #justiceforgeorge
Also on Saturday
8pm-2am UTC+02 // Corona d'Amore // Tune in *** MAIN ROOM *** Kris Baha (live), Luigi Di Venere, Jeffrey Sfire, Doc Sleep, Nemo - Sound Metaphors & Castro Moore, Sixsixsixties. *** COSMIC HOLE / XXX *** A/V by DJ Popper Trainer *** MORPHINE / Chill Out *** A/V by Tourguide (Music) and The Witch Twins (Visuals)
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2020-05-28

Is There Ethical Music Streaming Under Capitalism? // With a slew of potential alternatives to Spotify, both new and old, there’s never been a better time to leave mainstream streaming services behind. Now it’s the responsibility of music fans to jump ship.

RA.730 Mike Servito // People have been tremendously generous and supportive and I am very grateful for that. I've been able to donate money to Mike Huckaby's family and to various organizations and charities. I've been able to pay my bills.

This is about helping others, giving back, and ultimately survival here in the US. I think being optimistic and realistic about it all is key. This is uncharted territory for us all. I'm just trying to have my heart and mind in the right place.


Unsound 2019 – Complicity and Accountability: Our Agency in Counterculture // Some things haven’t changed so much since this panel: when marginalised crews requested financial support, others in the scene balked and yet, not so long after, those at the top of the chain asked for support themselves.

The moment we are in is so many things: crisis, disaster, or existential reality check some would say. But, like every moment, it is an opportunity to look upon the dynamics and circumstances of the past, and consider how that can inform a better path moving forwards.


BBC Sounds: The Gospel of Grime // As the once niche scene for religious ministry within UK rap increasingly reaches the mainstream, music and culture journalist Jesse Bernard traces the relationship between secular music and black churches in the UK.

He looks at how colonialism and slavery shaped the role music plays in black Christian faith communities. And with the help of theologians and musicians, he explores why issues of social justice are frequently left unaddressed within the Church.

Jesse examines how long standing social inequality and the current policy of austerity have impacted both black churches and the music being made by black artists in the UK. And he asks - is it so controversial for our everyday lives and our spiritual lives to be explored, side by side, in popular music?


Larry Kramer: a titan of gay rights and literature whose prophecies live on // It is sadly fitting that the United States slouched to 100,000 deaths from the coronavirus on the very day that he died. One has to but look at the statistics to see that this has become a black disease, a Latinx disease and a disease of poverty.

As states begin reopening earlier than medical experts advise, as middle-class white Americans insist it is their constitutional right to go clothes shopping, to go to parties and to hair salons – all without wearing masks – I look back at Kramer’s words to Jane Pauley:

“There’s no question in my mind, if this were happening to you and the white, straight middle-class community it would have been attended to a long time ago.”
Thursday
6-7:30 // Neurotransmitters 1 - Experimental Housewife // The first in our series of DJ Mixes and live performances. Serotonin friends and family are invited to our online chat to talk about all things electro techno etc.

7-12 // Not Mass: Live with gFx & Naive // gFx & Naive had been planning a big ole party for the club, and 'rona will not stop them. Join us for some intercontinental love ft. VIOLET, OVERLAND, BOO LEAN, AXOLOTL and visuals by MAX AMMO. Love and miss everyone!
Friday
Saturday
2pm-5am // Rave Luck Club // To commemorate Asian and Pacific Islander American Heritage Month (APAIHM), two staples of the DC underground team up to celebrate with a stunning 15 hour streamed showcase of DJs and producers of Asian heritage.
5pm-close // Visions of a New World: Vol Xxxix // A cinematic event series that brings visual artists and live musicians into conversation. Each edition will feature new visual artists and live sound performances, highlighting the Bay Area's dense creative output as a community.
Sat 12pm to Sun 12pm // No Dance, No Revolution // An international lineup of queer DJs & fundraiser for organizations aiding Chile's most vulnerable in the current food crisis. (Lineup includes NYC DJs Joey Quiñones & Ne/Re/A)

1-6 // Inverted Audio Live From Fiese Remise // Broadcasting live from Fiese Remise in Berlin via Twitch with deejay sets from Flørist, DJ Fart In The Club and DJ Heartbreak, as part of our effort to help raise funds to save Fiese Remise and Diskothek Melancholie 2 from closure.

4-12 // The Bunker Stream: Gunnar Haslam // We welcome our label artist Gunnar Haslam, who has done a couple artist Salons but not a DJ set. GH is a very deep selector and will be presenting this set radio style, covering a lot of ground, radio-style from jazz to dancehall, compas to cybernetic.

6-10 // As You Like It Coast to Coast: Portland, OR // AYLI kicks off a monthly Fault Radio residency dedicated to shining light on underground communities “Coast to Coast,” The initial installment features three local Portland artists, Strategy, Andy Warren and Sappho, and a San Francisco artist, Brendan Finlayson, who hails from Portland.

6-12 // Wrecked Residents Night w/ Ron Like Hell & Ryan Smith // We had a lot of fun with round one, so back for round 2 of Residents Night. Join Ron Like Hell and Ryan Smith for an evening of music to groove to in the home.

8-12 // Large Marge Power Hour and Noncompliant // Rachel Noon’s Large Marge party returns to the airwaves to get your heart pumping and your body moving. Midwest techno legend Noncompliant closes out the night.
Sunday
3-9 // The Bunker Tea Dance: Justin Cudmore & Mike Swells // This Sunday for the tea dance we return to Justin Cudmore and Mike Swells' apartment for one of their regular sessions.

3-11 // Virtually Sauna // She's back. Streaming live. Lineup: Bé
zier, Wahine, Dylan Reece, Nikki Nair, Jared Boyd - All Memphis vinyl set

5-9 // Virtually Nowadays: Mister Sunday with Eamon Harkin and AceMoMa // This week, resident DJ Eamon Harkin lights it up with rising New York duo, AceMoMa.


5-11 // Virtual Sunset: Feel The Sun // DJs: Galen, Solar. We will preface the dance portion with a wonderfully calming Sound Bath & Meditation.
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2020-05-21

Love Injection Fanzine 56 (Digital PDF Only) // ** This issue is free, but if you would like you can Venmo: @loveinjection **

I’m cynical enough to not entirely disregard the current aid policy stasis as a form of malignant neglect that, amongst other things, conveniently further expedites consolidation of, say, the restaurant and food service industries, in the hands of a few larger entities.

Every business owner is going to have to sit down at the table with their landlord and negotiate.


It just seems realistic to think of other ways to make a living, at least for the next year and a half or so.

In a few short days I’d gone from being a person who was preparing to provide to mutual aid to others to being a person who was reliant on receiving it. The gratitude I have for these people stepping in to help me knows no bounds.

When I was sick, when the health care system failed me, when the clubs closed and the streets went quiet, what really had value was: is there someone I can call that can bring me groceries. Is there someone who can pick up my prescription. Is there someone I can call that I trust because I’m afraid I might be dying.


The “worst-case scenario” is the same for everyone - we don’t reopen. However, an even “worse” case scenario is opening at limited capacity with a mountain of debt and not being able to cover bills.

The problem is structural, the American society as a whole does not have any safety net. Now more than ever before, this is what this crisis is showing us.

I think the recent, general pivot of the NYC Mayor’s Office from relentlessly harassing us to giving us a small seat at the table is definitely a start in the right direction. The newly-formed Office Of Nightlife is certainly doing what it can to help.

Mutual aid is great but the responsibility of care shouldn’t always fall on vulnerable communities to support each other (lest we all burn out). But I also have no faith in the larger powers-that-be to do anything helpful.

Clubs can honestly serve as venues for community organizing, soup kitchens – using the resources, using the downtime of these places to be more plugged in to the community that they’re a part of as opposed to being the repositories for leisure of the monied.


Is There a Safe Way to Throw Socially Distanced Shows? // In New York, the hardest-hit state, Governor Cuomo has placed arts and entertainment spaces in the fourth phase of reopenings, which could be months down the line. Large swaths of the live music industry are waiting on local and state guidelines for safe reopening.

The complex reality of a musician traveling through multiple regions of the country is near-impossible to imagine without a more coordinated government response to the pandemic.

Even in a country with a state-of-the-art virus response, a recent outbreak centered around nightclubs in the Itaewon area of Seoul has raised questions about the viability of public, indoor gatherings; a single positive carrier exposed 1,500 people in one night.


The Untold Story Of The Detroit Regional Music Conference // Dedicated to Mike Huckaby and all the black people who will once again bear the brunt of America's misguided deeds.

To them it was normal to showcase the black gay and lesbian underground that shaped their sound. Today such things are championed openly. It is a shame that it could not pull through.

This story, although brief, is important. It speaks to the heart of the city, to the soul of the people who have given techno and so much more to American culture. No complaints, no feeling sorry for one's self, just doing the work and getting stuff done. Making things happen when others will not.


"All Things Quarantine Considered" with Emilie Friedlander // Emilie is a freelance writer, contributing editor at Vice, and a co-founder of AdHoc. We talk about her recent piece There Is No Such Thing as Independent Music in the Age of Coronavirus

Good info, little relief at San Francisco's Virtual Nightlife + Entertainment Summit // Missing were voices of actual workers, relegated to Zoom’s Q&A function, rather than just officials, owners, managers, and CEOs. And there was a lot of “we’re all in this together and we’ll get through it,” when, for increasingly desperate business owners forced to rely on GoFundMes and averse to shouldering loan debt in uncertain times—that clearly may not be the case.

18% of the SF labor force has applied for unemployment in the last two months, the highest percentage ever recorded. Up to 50% of that unemployment number is nightlife and entertainment workers.


The Stud closes its location—to save itself for the future // Without any rent breaks/suspension or more direct financial support, small business like ours are faced with a tough choice: Close our doors now, get nimble, and try to move forward? Or keep losing money and hope this blows over before we owe hundreds of thousands of dollars?

We’ve built an amazing online presence with our weekly Drag Alive show, and soon we’ll be a full-fledged virtual club, broadcasting an entire slate of our parties online. While it’s still not nearly enough, our beloved performers, DJs, and even bar staff (serving “virtual shots”) are earning tips and staying working.


'I found the roots of electronic music in a cupboard!': the tale of India's lost techno pioneers // He accidentally uncovered a cache of long-forgotten recordings that had not been touched for nearly five decades. It led him to a fascinating story that he explores in a new BBC Radio 3 documentary, Electronic India.

Approximations of Indian classical music gave way to compositions that were communicating natural environments through synthesised sound. “Then they got more experimental and free-spirited, as if the Moog was helping them decouple from the country’s traditions. They became connected to ideas of the techno-imaginary, and new futures.”


First Floor #38 – What About YouTube? // Unlike Spotify, YouTube is a hotbed for people posting content (e.g. music) that they have no legal right to, sometimes done in bulk by “channels,” which then monetize by allowing ads on music they don’t own.

Unlike major labels, most electronic music artists and labels don’t have the time or resources to constantly monitor and maintain control over the use of their catalogs online.

There would be more of an incentive for artists and labels to be proactive about this stuff if the potential compensation was higher. But even for tracks whose licensing and rights are in order, YouTube generally pays an even lower royalty rate than Spotify.

Why is YouTube getting a pass? My guess is that it’s because it became an ingrained part of our online consumption patterns long before conversations about streaming services and fair pay became commonplace.


Spotify Sues Self-Described 'Music Prodigy' Who Allegedly Ran Royalties Scam // Spotify says Jake Noch "[generated] hundreds of millions of fraudulent streams" and engaged in "title track parasitism" among other fraudulent practices on its platform.

Unmasked Ball: Cocaine, ketamine, models, and music: New York City’s underground party scene carries on during the pandemic // 
🤮🤮🤮
Please support your favorite venues
Livestreams
Boiler Room: streaming from isolation
𝕔𝓛𝐮в ɊυÃⓇ𝔞NⓉĮŇE
RA: Streamland
Thotyssey NYC Events
United We Stream (Berlin)
Virtually Nowadays
Thursday
7pm // Not Mass: Live with Cold Cuts // Tune in this week as Cold Cuts kicks off their first Not Mass stream with head chef Jarrett Tebbets and a special one time streaming of Mike Huckaby's final set at Hot Mass from the summer of 2018.

9-12 // Virtually Nowadays: Planetarium with Davis Galvin and Father of Two // Planetarium is an event series where we clear the floor between our speakers, add pillows and blankets, and welcome listeners to zone out and invite djs to play beyond the dancefloor spectrum. The deep listening continues virtually, with Pittsburgh in the house via gentle selections from Davis Galvin and In Training's Father of Two.
Friday
Saturday
Begins Sat noon, ends Sun midnight // No Way Back: Streaming From Beyond // Bryan Kasenic, Mike Servito, Derek Plaslaiko, BMG, Eris Drew, Erika, Patrick Russell, Mozghan, Scott Zacharias, Christina Chatfield (live), Imaginary Softwoods (live), Antenes, Farplane aka SOLD and Hi-Vis, Grant Aaron (Mysteries of the Deep).
MUTEK.SF Presents Nexus Experience // Live AV performers and DJs on multiple stages, installations in online galleries, a screening room of short films, artist workshops.
8-12 // Virtual Saturday: Breakwave and Lee Gamble // Lockdown with two singular artists and some of the UK's finest DJs: IUQ boss Lee Gamble and Meine Nacht label head Breakwave.
Sunday
8-12 // Virtual Sunday: Mister Sunday Season Opener // We'll be broadcasting a four-hour video of Eamon and Justin from a full Mister Sunday in a summer past. Clear some space on your roof, find a socially distant spot in the park to set up a speaker, or at least open your window, and get down with us.
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2020-05-14
How countries plan to restart nightclubs and music festivals // While scenes in China have seen nightlife cautiously return, South Korea's initial club reopenings are linked to a recent spike of COVID-19 infections in the country, resulting in another nightlife shutdown. Given that, it feels unlikely live music, festivals and club nights will completely return in absence of a vaccine.

Still, various governments, like Spain and Ireland, have outlined multi-stage plans to reopen clubs, music festivals and venues along with the rest of the economy.


First Floor #37 – Club Petri Dish // Even if a venue is sterilized before its doors open, won’t cleaning be needed throughout the night? How can patrons regularly wash their hands when the bathroom line is 10-plus minutes long? How can those bathroom lines, often crammed into tiny corridors, even form safely when social distancing requires us to stand 1.5 meters apart? Will this extend to the dancefloor as well? Will masks be required? Can we really expect clubgoers to abide by these kinds of precautions?

The risks of infection are very real, and even if 90% of a crowd follows whatever new rules are put in place, this new South Korean outbreak is proof that it literally only takes one person to infect dozens of others.
Shanghai club ALL launches fundraiser to prevent closure // ALL Club, Shanghai's epicentre for experimental electronic music, is urgently raising funds as the financial fallout from COVID-19 threatens its future. ALL will close out the month by hosting either its last-ever party or celebrating its survival. Amsterdam's Red Light Radio will close in June // In a statement posted on social media, the station said it had "always been aware" its Oudekerksplein location was temporary, but the global pandemic had "accelerated the inevitable goodbye."

Coronavirus latest // Everything we know about how COVID-19 is affecting the electronic music scene.
Truancy Volume 264: Turtle Bugg // The bookings at Dweller are all black, which is very important considering black people created this shit but like all aspects of life we are always the last to profit. People of colour, but black people especially, are such a tiny percentage of lineups. It is honestly disgusting.

When I was a fresh neu-Bushwhack celebutante there was not a large visible black contingent such as now. Five-to-seven years ago we used to joke about it because you could count the black people under 35 years of age in the “scene” on two hands. That’s not only artists but black people who hung around the parties at all!

I was always decrying the importance of black culture upon the parties that white folks so casually engaged in for no more than temporary fulfilment. Frankie and I are homies and we used to talk about these things a lot usually while blazing. At one point I told her there needed to be something like Discwoman but for black people and was trying to convince her to do that as well.


Remembering Mike Huckaby, Who Delivered Detroit’s Music To The World // During his 13 years managing the Dance Room of Record Time in Roseville, a suburb northeast of Detroit, he became a mentor to several generations of house and techno DJs and producers, as well as an expert curator and a encyclopedic fount of knowledge to inquisitive consumers.

Huckaby's own mentor was the late Ken Collier, a legendary Detroit club DJ who had a residency at a black gay after-hours spot called Heaven.

“When I first came to Record Time, I asked him, ‘Where could I see the real deal? Where could I see something that was on the level of Ron Hardy or Frankie Knuckles? And he said ‘Man, you have to go the gay clubs. They archive this music and keep it alive. You have to go to black gay clubs if you want to hear what happened to disco and how it became house.”


Remembering Kraftwerk's Florian Schneider // With Kraftwerk, the band he cofounded, he would come to define everything hopeful about postwar-Europe: technological advancement, prosperity, open borders and freedom of movement. By bringing synthesizers into the mainstream and inspiring the originators of techno, hip-hop and electro, Kraftwerk has had a profound impact on 20th century music.

Revaluing music in the digital economy: an interview with Austin Hou from Currents // I don’t believe the piracy narrative, it’s too simple. It gained traction because it suits major labels, obscuring the strategic errors they made in response to the disruption of the music industry the internet caused, and its initial threat to their gatekeeping powers in the distribution and consumption of music. It’s also the best narrative for the streaming services to circulate to justify mugging artists off, paying us obscure decimals and telling us it’s better than nothing.

This is why I’ve been on the look-out for a platform that empowers artists in my corner of music, and why I wanted to find out more about new project Currents. For now, it’s a website that is built around direct subscriptions to artists, who can create lists of music and upload their own, like OnlyFans or Patreon but focused exclusively on music.


Rave scenes and electronic music have long been associated with oppositional and counter-hegemonic values and cultures. In ‘90s dance music, the underlying economic setup in many cities with strong scenes was also, perhaps by necessity, oppositional: it was formed of decentralised networks of independent labels, distributors and record shops operating mostly outside the major label system.

From the perspective of artists, the rise of streaming services coincides with the economic devaluation of recorded music to the point where plays are worth fractions of a penny, which hardly ever amount to much. This is all while Spotify, which became the most valuable music company in the world two years ago, loudly proclaims they have recaptured the revenue streams that were lost in the dark days of piracy.

Recontextualising music online and reshaping digital spaces to have positive benefits for music creators is essentially a political and ethical struggle. The streaming services that dominate now didn’t evolve of their own accord, they were shaped by the values and cultures of the people who founded them, and the economic model of platform capitalism that emerged in the wake of the 2008 global financial crisis. It’s important to consider the ethics driving any new project before you get onboard with it.


Penny Fractions: How Private Equity Drained the Record Industry // The oligopolistic control of major labels, which in turn dictates the rules of streaming platforms, can be traced back to the mid-80s dreams of luring Wall Street cash into the record industry. Ultimately, record label executives succeeded, but to the detriment of thousands of jobs, many artists’ careers, and the destruction of several labels that helped create this industry.

Andrew deWaard, an assistant professor at the University of California, San Diego, argued in a chapter from his forthcoming book Content Wars: Tech Empires vs. Media Empires that 2004 was the year when financialization kicked into high gear within the music industry. A pattern emerged in the 00s where private equity firms took swings at running the music industry’s largest firms.


Miquela, a CGI-generated influencer & music artist created by an entertainment company, has signed as CAA’s first virtual client // This is the new era of Blackface. Gone are the days of calling Ariana Grande the top Black artist and influencer. Now white people can generate digital/racially ambiguous pop stars and push designer clothes and apple products this way...

People speak very confidently about music and music history having only been exposed to reading advertisements about it

CTM 2020: Critical Solidarity – How to Foster Dialogue between Musicians and Journalists? // From precarity to anxiety, challenges aren’t exclusive to either role, and both positions depend quite heavily on one another. How could means of mutual support be devised?

Bring Back Turntable.fm // Turntable was part of an older, more tribal internet that mostly went the way of blogs as social media rose to dominance.

man apologizes for breaking quarantine for a house party
over 1200 independent venues form NIVA coalition to help survive COVID-19 pandemic // The group recently delivered a letter to Congress with ideas for solutions to the existential crisis facing the industry, and “seeking national guidelines for large gatherings to occur in a safe manner.” You can read it in full here. They’re also encouraging people to contact their elected officials about helping the industry survive, and they have a letter template you can use to do so here.

Over 1200 venues and promoters are members, including, in NYC and the surrounding area, Le Poisson Rouge, AdHoc Presents, Arlene’s Grocery, Avant Gardner, Baby’s All Right, Blackthorn 51, City Winery, City Parks Foundation’s SummerStage, Drom, Elsewhere, Gold Sounds, Hammerstein Ballroom, Knitting Factory, Knockdown Center, Littlefield, Market Hotel, MeanRed Productions, National Sawdust, Nublu, Our Wicked Lady, Pioneer Works, Rocks Off, S.O.B’s, Saint Vitus, Bowery Ballroom, The Broadway, Capitol Theatre, The Delancey, The Kingsland, The Sultan Room, Trans-Pecos, TV Eye, Union Pool, White Eagle Hall, and more.
Please support your favorite venues
Livestreams
Boiler Room: streaming from isolation
𝕔𝓛𝐮в ɊυÃⓇ𝔞NⓉĮŇE
RA: Streamland
Thotyssey NYC Events
United We Stream (Berlin)
Virtually Nowadays
Thursday
2-4pm // The Lot Radio: Justin Strauss

7-9 // Not Mass: live with Detour // Detour streams right to your screens with a DIY “Magenta screen” installation. Gusto [DETOUR, MISC] - PGH, Naeem [DETOUR] - PGH.


8-12 // Raw Unkut and Simo Cell // Brooklyn-based Ukrainian dj Raw Unkut has an ear for the darker side of electro and dnb. She'll team up with French bass experimentalist Simo Cell for this Thursday night virtual rave.

9-11 // Susanne Bartsch Wants You On Top // Party in your bedroom, living room, or even rooftop! Join New York City's vibrant queer nightlife creatures from anywhere in the world.

10-12 // The Lot Radio: Weird Science with Amourette
Friday
5-9pm // FIXED Livestream: Firehouse with Kim Ann Foxman // FIXED is back with our second livestream from the Bad Room at Good Room! This time we'll be featuring a 4 hour set from our friend Kim Ann Foxman who always brings the energy. We're looking forward to having her stretch out a bit for this one.

8-12 // Roza Terenzi and Toni Yotzi // Two of Australia's most exciting djs (not to mention hometown friends and heroes) Roza Terenzi and Toni Yotzi are both known for their wide palettes and futuristic approach to retro sounds. Lock in for a night of extraterrestrial electro, breakbeat rave, current dubstep and more.

9pm-3am // HARDER -Strike Stone / SPRKLBB / DJ TEETH // Featuring A HOT LIVE ACT ALL THE WAY FROM TENNESSEE. The first HARDER peep-o-rama was 🔥🔥🔥
Saturday
8am-8pm // The Bunker Stream with Eric Cloutier // We welcome our resident DJ Eric Cloutier to the stream for the first time. He'll presenting a 12 hour all vinyl "Shopping the Shelves" set from his studio in Berlin.

2pm // Slit - A Virtual Rave Feat. DJ Kaos11, U.R.Trax, Repro, High Future and More

6-8 // The Lot Radio: Physical Therapy

8-12 // Lydo and Juliana Huxtable // New York dj and X-TRA.SERVICES founder Lydo joins forces with artist, theorist and dj Juliana Huxtable to set the airwaves on fire.
Sunday
3-9pm // The Bunker Tea Dance: Mike Servito & Love Letters // This Sunday for the tea dance we return to Mike Servito and Love Letters' apartment for one of their regular sessions.

8-12 // Sweat Equity All Night // Sweat Equity is a record label and party series helmed by Daniel Creahan, aka Alien D. He's assembled a special crew of friends and affiliates for this one, including Doctor Earth, Plebeian and Overland, whose next release arrives June 2020 via Sweat Equity.

11pm-?am // Digital Queen! with Michael Serafini / Garrett David / Lucy Stoole / More // Digital Queen! Livestream with Michael Serafini (Queen!, Gramaphone Records), Garrett David (Queen!, smartbar). Hosted by Lucy Stoole / Nico / Jojo Baby. Featuring guests Bambi Banks Couleé / Valentine Addams / Ramona Slick
Copyright © 2020 Techno Queers NY, All rights reserved.
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2020-05-07
NYC Music Venues Struggle To Adapt To An Extended Coronavirus Lockdown // "We, like many small businesses, are still waiting on any sort of word from the SBA (Small Business Administration) or from one of the PPP lenders, so we’re still kind of in this limbo like many others are.”

Small Clubs Are Where Rock History Is Made. How Many Will Survive? // Independent venues are critical to local scenes and artists on the rise. With concerts on hold during the pandemic, they’re struggling to hang on and fighting for government aid.

Great Scott, a Boston rock club institution, will not re-open after coronavirus // With its wood-paneled bars and planks and checkerboard linoleum floor, the decidedly old-school Great Scott was a relic of a Boston’s fading dive bar circuit, but also a thriving hotbed for live music and dance parties. It was the longtime home to indie dance party the pill and all-inclusive dance night Don’t Ask Don’t Tell.

This is What a “Social Distancing Concert” Looks Like // The 1,100 seat venue will have its capacity drawn down 80% to just 229, scattered throughout the venue. Each small group of tickets that are next to each other are being dubbed “fan pods” (after whales, I suppose). They have to be purchased together in groups of two to thirteen seats, a minimum of six feet apart from other fan pods. Individual tickets are not available.


Events will return to Spain this month, with open-air events of 800 allowed in June // Events will also be allowed to return, according to IQ magazine, with no more than 30 people for indoor events and 200 for open-air events. They will require social-distancing guidelines, like spaced-out assigned seating, to be implemented.

84% of Music Freelancers Still Waiting on Coronavirus Relief Funds: Survey // 59% reported that they experienced delays or were unable to complete their applications due to broken and unresponsive web systems, while 58% reported that they received "confusing or incorrect guidance" on how to apply as a freelancer, 37% reported that applications or funding streams closed before they were able to apply and 33% reported that they spent over 20 hours researching and/or applying for government relief.

First Floor #36 – Pull Your Music Off Spotify // Barring some sort of major shift in its business model, Spotify simply won’t be capable of paying artists more, and other large platforms are unlikely to take that initiative on their own. Knowing that, there’s only one option that makes sense for independent artists and labels: removing your music from streaming platforms.

It’s silly for an experimental noise artist to be operating in the same sphere as Drake, but that’s what’s happening on Spotify. Why don’t we cultivate spaces that cater only to the folks who really want to be there? Bandcamp is one of those spaces, and unlike many of the streaming giants, its operation is already profitable.

 
Penny Fractions: Streaming Saved the Record Biz, Not Artists // The streaming-first record industry is one where not only are majors still very much in power but the format closes the box towards other ways of fans engaging with one’s music. If the concern about Napster was that artists lost control over their work and it could be accessed for free, that’s not changed at all except that now the entire industry agreed to this new set-up. It isn’t clear what form it’ll take for artists to really get concessions from streaming platforms but this moment is opening the door.

A Revolution During Uncertain Times: The Music Workers Alliance in NYC Fights Against Economic Injustice // Music Workers Alliance, a grassroots organization and movement in New York City, formed in late March during the onset of the United States’ COVID-19 outbreak. So far, the Alliance has been successful in expanding legislative eligibility for unemployment benefits, providing gig workers with immediate relief from the financial burdens they are facing.

Music Workers Alliance has now shifted its focus to issues concerning commercial copyright infringement in the digital domain. The Alliance is fed up with the exploitative profit models available online. The organization is working on a local level to change the profit margins for online companies that circulate music. They’re coming together, as their current petition states, to set a precedent against the prevailing “unfair treatment, lack of benefits, contracts and representation,” in the digital realm.


The Live-Streaming Project That Can Help Save Live Music Venues // The fundraising platform United We Stream hosts concerts, DJ sets and other live performances in European cities to keep clubs from going out of business.


Holly Herndon Launches New Podcast With Mat Dryhurst // “We will publish conversations with good people at the forefront of music, technology and policy from our studio in Berlin,” Herndon and Dryhurst wrote on their Pateron page. The podcast will also include “exclusive discussions and progress reports available to patrons only.”

DiscUs 004 Global Q Updates // Updates from Discwoman founders, Princess Peggie, Octo Octa, Debonair, DJ Bus Replacement Service, They/Them DJ, Amu, and Anuraag.
Please support your favorite clubs
Livestreams
Boiler Room: streaming from isolation
𝕔𝓛𝐮в ɊυÃⓇ𝔞NⓉĮŇE
RA: Streamland
Thotyssey NYC Events
United We Stream (Berlin)
Virtually Nowadays
Thursday
4pm // Danny Daze takes on the Space Miami Terrace straight to your homes! This will be a GLOBAL RAVE!

8-12 // Significant Other, Only Child, DJ Fart in the Club // Club Night Club is a roving Brooklyn party that specializes in all things breaks and bass. Resident DJs and co-founders Significant Other and Only Child bring us into their world in the first half of the stream, followed by the super-amped sounds and signature party-starting style we've grown to love from Berlin-based DJ Fart in the Club.

9-11 // Susanne Bartsch Wants You On Top // Party in your bedroom, living room, or even rooftop! Join New York City's vibrant queer nightlife creatures from anywhere in the world.
Friday
Saturday
3pm-12am // The Carry Nation May Moment // Tammy’s been enjoying some socially distant time in the sun and is sporting her hot new look for the season! Tammy is protecting herself and others by keeping her mask ON. Won’t you PLEASE do the same? Or better yet, don’t leave the house.
4-12 // The Bunker Stream: Erika // For this stream we go into the home studio of Erika of Interdimensional Transmissions for an 8 hour DJ set that is sure to cover a lot of terrain.

8-12 // Umfang, DJ Swisha and Kush Jones // Nowadays resident and Discwoman co-founder Umfang teams up with Juke Bounce Work crew members and beloved NY selectors Kush Jones and DJ Swisha.
Sunday
2-8pm // The Bunker Stream: Patrick Russell // For this special birthday set, Patrick will be digging deep into his collection to bring us music from the already wide spectrum of what you might expect to hear from him and beyond.

8-12 // Aurora Halal and Club Fitness // Nowadays resident and Mutual Dreaming boss Aurora Halal is joined by rising London selector Club Fitness to round out another week of Virtually Nowadays.
Copyright © 2020 Techno Queers NY, All rights reserved.
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2020-04-30
Remembering Mike Huckaby, a Towering Figure in Detroit House Music // Huckaby — who died from complications of a stroke and Covid-19 at Beaumont Hospital in Detroit’s Royal Oak suburb — was one of global dance music’s most widely beloved figures.

“He was the guy there working with young people, showing them how to produce — just building and creating with electronic music."

Remembering Mike Huckaby: Ten Tracks And One Mix // To the people who knew him personally, his impeccable taste and his gifts as an artist loomed large, but they were only part of the story. What really set Huckaby apart was his dedication to giving back.

"The impact of shaping and changing kids' life is far greater than playing a festival in Europe," he told us in our film Real Scenes: Detroit. "I think this work here is highly needed, is highly necessary." Every scene around the world would be lucky to have someone with that attitude.

Bandcamp Will Again Waive Fees To Support Artists // The music marketplace and streaming service Bandcamp will once again forgo its share of sales for a 24-hour period this Friday, May 1, the company announced Monday. The initiative will also repeat on June 5 and July 3, and will last from 12 a.m. to 11:59 p.m. PST time on all three days.

DJ Sets Are Going Online—But Is Anyone Getting Paid? // A desire for community and connection are valid motivations for livestreaming, but the fact remains that few of these events are paying artists. That may change, especially once brands and their marketing teams shift their focus from real-world events to online ones.

Artist and tech researcher Mat Dryhurst has referred to this practice as “e-busking,” as it represents a new paradigm in which performers will have to earn a living by virtually singing for their supper, over and over again.


Distinctions between independent and interdependent musical practices

Spotify's 'tip jar' is a slap in the face for musicians. It should pay them better // Spotify’s method of generating the premium subscriptions that will turn it a profit was canny: draw people in with an excellent user experience and relatively light advertising in the free version during its early years, then ramp up the advertising to near-intolerable levels and wait for users to cave in to spending a tenner a month.

Many casual music fans are now spending money more regularly on music than they did in the download or CD era. But the nature of the exchange has utterly changed: people are not paying for music but for a lack of advertising. The music is available either way.


Chicago Independent Music Venues Have Lost More than $7 Million from Coronavirus // The music industry can't survive on GoFundMe and donations...

A new regular email dispatch from nighttime.org // Featuring updates, resources, and articles from nighttime communities, exploring how cities (from grassroots scenes to policymakers) are responding to the pandemic.

Zoom Is Cracking Down On Your Virtual Sex Parties // But some are skeptical as to whether Zoom can enforce its no-whoopie policy. The technology website PC Mag pointed out that the company’s own privacy guidelines state that “video, audio chat content is not stored” on the platform “unless a meeting is recorded by the host,” making it difficult for Zoom to monitor or surveil content.

What’s more, Zoom has much bigger fish to fry than whether its rapidly growing user base is showing each other their no-no parts. The platform has reportedly targeted by frequent “Zoom bombings,” in which right-wing trolls infiltrate group chats to harass participants with racist, sexist, and homophobic slurs.

#38 __ playgrounds of identity // Parties are laboratories of social and personal experimentation, playgrounds for possible versions of ourselves explored through conversation with the environment, music, lights, and crowd. Similarly, the internet was not always a place where we were expected to use the name, voice, and face given to us by our parents. We can explore and express our identities through chosen usernames, avatars, and a bit of imaginative roleplay.


Flashback // The intention of this project is to capture oral histories from individuals who attended Acid House parties in Blackburn between 1989 and 1991, preserving the moments these people choose to remember and celebrate, rather than present a historic overview or definitive chronology.

It's a London Thing: How Rare Groove, Acid House and Jungle Remapped the City // How does music help us to understand the contemporary city? Caspar Melville, co-chair of the Centre for Creative Industries, Media and Screen Studies at SOAS, University of London, explores three music scenes to tell the story of modern London.

EX.506 Jeremy Deller // The Turner Prize-winning artist on the social and political importance of rave culture.

EX.507 The Hour: Fruity Loops // E.M.M.A., Pearson Sound and Blackdown on the software that democratised electronic music.

MU51063A: Electronic Music Composition and History // slides
Week 1: Early Instruments, Early Studios, Musique Concrète
Week 2: Early Studios (cont’d), Elektronische Musik, Krautrock
Week 3: Sampling, Looping, and the Remix
Week 4: Dub and the Studio as Instrument
Week 5: Drone, Ambient, and “Minimalism”
Week 6: Noise / Feedback / Liveness
Week 7: Techno / House / Dance Music Genres
Week 8: Glitch / Microsound / Circuit Bending
Week 9: Computer Music


An LA creative studio has designed a pandemic-proof raving suit // It’s just a design at this point and no suits have actually been produced. But if the virus doesn’t subside and lockdown measures keep dragging on, it might be needed.

If Wearing This Weird Suit Is the Future of Concerts, Do We Still Want to Go? // Production Club, a creative studio that specializes in experiential events and has worked on Skrillex's high-tech stage shows, designed the Micrashell with concerts and music festival in mind, and the lightweight-but-airtight wearable PPE has a built-in N95 air filter, a soft helmet and face shield, and a fully integrated internal speaker system.


L Train Tunnel Project Is Complete Ahead Of Schedule, Cuomo Says // Cuomo said the project is done today under budget and ahead of schedule, after 12 months of work to repair damage caused by Superstorm Sandy.
Nowadays: We are in need of a good commercial real estate attorney who is willing to work pro bono, and we are looking for people who can give Nowadays a private loan or invest. If you are interested or able, please email us at hello@nowadays.nyc. If you know someone who might be interested, please forward.
Basement & Knockdown Center // Staff support donations
Bossa // Venmo: (bossanovacivicclub)
Black Flamingo // GoFundMe
Elsewhere
Good Room // merch
House Of Yes // GoFundMe
Jupiter Disco // Serving liquor, beer, cocktails to-go
Market Hotel // GoFundMe
Mood Ring & Heaven or Las Vegas // Venmo or Cashapp (MoodRingNYC)
Nowadays // Staff Help Venmo // Patreon
Public Records // Staff Support GoFundMe // Patreon
Saint Vitus
The Deep End // GoFundMe
The Sultan Room // Email them about gift cards
Trans-Pecos // Venmo // Help the Trans-Pecos staff in crisis
Union Pool Employee Fund

Support Your Local Venues From Afar (Thotyssey)

techno4hire // Classifieds to connect workers in techno, nightlife, and beyond with work during coronavirus. Submit by DM with title, text, handle, email, location


pickuptheflownyc // Covid-19 resources

Coronavirus latest // Everything we know about how COVID-19 is affecting the electronic music scene.
Livestreams
Thursday
4-10 // A Mike Huckaby Archive Marathon // Celebrating the life of our friend, mentor and Detroit legend Mike Huckaby, featuring Huck's sets from Movement Festival 2006-2018.

6-8 // The Lot Radio: Apocalipsis by Riobamba

7 // Not Mass: Live Online with Honcho // Pittsburgh's Hot Mass takes it online every Thursday, kicking off tonight with each resident crew rotating weekly. Honcho starts us off with Aaron Clark, Clark Price, and d'Adhemar. Any donations during the stream will be divided between Hot Mass DJs, door staff and bartenders who are out of work.

8-12 // Ariel Zetina, Dime and Him Hun // Tonight’s virtual party arrives with big thanks to Brooklyn’s Dime and Chicago DJs Ariel Zetina and Him Hun. Get familiar with the sounds of the North American queer techno underground.
Friday
5/1 4pm - 5/3 6pm // Mayday, Mayday! // This is the New York Nightlife / Underground music community; Coordinates 40*37’29’’N 73*57’8’’W, Kings County, Brooklyn, NY; Presently low fuel remaining for hundreds of souls on board all displaced from community, shelter, and essential supplies to live. CODE RED!! Digital Fundraising Festival sound tracked by some of New York’s best. Let's help spotlight the talent and establishments that need our support.
6-8 // The Lot Radio: quest?onmarc

8-12 // Ciel and Sybil // Toronto-based Discwoman affiliate Ciel and London selector and SIREN co-founder Sybil got you covered from the dreamy to the banging and psychedelic.
Saturday
9am-5pm // The Bunker Live Stream: Tin Man and LDY OSC // For this stream we go into the home of Tin Man and LDY OSC, two artists from The Bunker family who have found love and partnership. Throughout the day they will be exploring the more deeper listening side of their music, with both live and DJ sets.

6-8 // The Lot Radio: Physical Therapy

8-12 // Beats In Space x Night Tales: Tim Sweeney & Fantastic Man

8-12 // Low Jack and Star Eyes // Two wickedly assorted hours from Editions Gravats head Low Jack, recorded at Nowadays back in early March, plus a session from Brooklyn’s queen of heavy bass Star Eyes.
Sunday
3-9 // The Bunker Stream: Tea Dance with Mike Servito // This Sunday we return once again with Mike Servito, The Bunker resident DJ, for a tea dance.

6-8 // The Lot Radio: Synthicide

8-12 // Binh All Night // Back in November we had the Berlin-based DJ and extended set pro Binh down for an all-nighter. Here's 4 hours of maximum vibes from the minimal master.
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2020-04-23
A CALL BY MUSICAL ARTISTS FOR BASIC FAIRNESS IN THE DIGITAL MARKETPLACE // Fewer than 100 signatures are needed for this petition to reach its goal!

There's No Such Thing as Independent Music in the Age of Coronavirus // As writer Liz Pelly has astutely observed, the very notion of "independent music" was already starting to feel pretty hollow in an era where artists are all beholden to streaming services that pay pennies-on-the-dollar per stream.

Now, for the first time in our lifetime, and partly because they've been forced to, musicians are collectively voicing the fact that they are not merely exquisite souls, but workers—workers who are now out of a job, and who deserve the same protections that all workers do.


Five major music-tech pivots happening right now // Tl;dr—
1. Digital media is becoming a core part of the fan experience, not just a means to an end.
2. Immersive, at-home video, not lean-back audio, is now the highest source of music consumption growth.
3. Artists and fans are turning to direct-to-consumer revenue models over third-party aggregation models.
4. Social isolation has led to a surge in demand for social music tech.
5 Without touring, digital scarcity could become a financial necessity for music.


Coronaraving: The Business Implications Behind All Those Livestreamed DJ Sets // Clubs remain the best place for a DJ to get paid to DJ, and right now, the future of nightclubs is uncertain. “We're really concerned,” says Goldstein, who also co-owns the Black Flamingo bar and club in Williamsburg. “Many of the bigger festivals are run by corporations who have insurance and deep pockets, but I know first hand how difficult the economics of running a club can be. Without leniency from landlords or some kind of help from the government, many clubs could go out of business.”

Radius clauses built into the contracts of now-cancelled events in March and April meant that many artists were effectively blocked from freely earning a living in the first three months of 2020. How these clauses will be enforced for events that get rescheduled to later this year remains an open question.


Bandcamp to waive fees again on May 1st // The platform's fees will once again be waived for a 24-hour period, so that all proceeds from sales go direct to artists (or labels). Bandcamp did their first direct-to-artist sale earlier this year, on March 20, when users spent over $4 million in a record day for sales.

Tuning In to Instagram D.J.s // You’re providing the soundtrack to botched come-ons, shouted confessions, measured walks to the bathroom. You see it all from afar, and then you offer something in exchange. Are you playing for the crowd, or for yourself? In the best moments, a d.j. is able to do both at once.

But, nostalgia aside, I’ve been watching because I like these glimpses of d.j.s working on their craft.


Brooklyn nightclub Elsewhere recreated itself in 'Minecraft' to host a virtual concert and raise money for coronavirus relief — see what it was like

Mayor cancels permits for NYC Pride Parade, Puerto Rican Day Parade and other June events // The cancellation order includes all other parades, concerts, rallies and other large gatherings scheduled for June.

Meet the artists driving Russia’s new wave of queer music // Perhaps the largest of its sort in the country, Moscow’s queer rave Popoff Kitchen, started by Nikita Egorov-Kirillov in 2016, has played a significant role in providing a physical space to experience a queer techno subculture, not unlike London’s Chapter 10 or Berlin’s Herrensauna.

Berlin releases €30 million in emergency grants for private institutions, including clubs // The fund is part of stage four of the city's emergency aid program, and it's intended to help museums, nightclubs, orchestras, cabarets and more weather continued closures under pandemic lockdown.
Video of Sylvester celebrating his 40th birthday. // Sylvester (September 6, 1947 – December 16, 1988) was a singer-songwriter known for his disco hits, including You Make Me Feel (Mighty Real), and his flamboyant personal style. He was openly gay and defied the gender binary.
The best ways you can help New York City's struggling music venues //

Bossa // Venmo: (bossanovacivicclub)
Black Flamingo // GoFundMe
Elsewhere
Good Room // merch
House Of Yes // GoFundMe
Jupiter Disco // Serving liquor, beer, cocktails to-go
Market Hotel // GoFundMe
Mood Ring & Heaven or Las Vegas // Venmo or Cashapp (MoodRingNYC)
Nowadays // Staff Help Venmo // Patreon
Public Records // Staff Support GoFundMe // Patreon
The Sultan Room // Email them about purchasing gift cards for when they reopen
Trans-Pecos // Venmo // Help the Trans-Pecos staff in crisis
Saint Vitus
The Lot
Union Pool Employee Fund

Support Your Local Venues From Afar (Thotyssey)

techno4hire // Classifieds to connect workers in techno, nightlife, and beyond with work during coronavirus. Submit by DM with title, text, handle, email, location


pickuptheflownyc // Covid-19 resources

Coronavirus latest // Everything we know about how COVID-19 is affecting the electronic music scene.
Livestreams

For the second edition, charity partners will be focussed on supporting marginalised groups in the electronic music community, with a full list to be confirmed before the event.

𝕔𝓛𝐮в ɊυÃⓇ𝔞NⓉĮŇE // a 🎀 𝓆𝓊𝑒𝑒𝓇 🎀 online dance party every 👏 day 👏 of 👏 the 👏 quarantine sun-fri 9pm-12am est sat 6pm-12am est zoom code: ‪87033597365
Thursday
9-11pm // Susanne Bartsch Wants You On Top // If you can't do the $10 ticket and you want to join our party, YOU CAN DONATE ANY $ amount that's comfortable for your budget. This is to support our Nightlife community Dj's, Hosts, Performers, as well as to have fun and connect in this insane and difficult time for all of us!
6-8 // The Lot Radio: DJ Swisha & Kush Jones

8-12 // Virtual Thursday: DJ Stingray and LOKA // Tonight's music is courtesy of two rave-ready sets: Detroit electro hero DJ Stingray recorded live at Nowadays for Dweller Festival in February, plus a special set from Cuban-American DJ and artist LOKA recorded specifically with the homebound dancers in mind.
Friday
9PM - 1AM EST // HARDER Peep O-Rama // HARDER brings you a peep show zoom party, where you are the show! This is your chance to bring your inner stripper out. Let's all get down and dirty in front of hundreds of sexy people from all over the US (and possibly other countries).